coffee date two

welcome to my second (late) coffee date!! i started writing it last night but i had to go to bible study. this time i got in the christmas spirit with a peppermint mocha – soy and no whip, of course. starbucks is one of few coffee shops that offer vegan mocha flavoring. if only they’d do the same with pumpkin spice!!

today i want to talk about something i’ve been hearing since i was little, but that in recent years has been directed at me: hateful words about “rich” people. first of all, what is “rich?” who is truly wealthy? from my childhood the people at my schools who were considered rich had certain brands of jeans and the latest phones, and were able to go to places like disneyland and cancun. but in high school i was the one who was being called “rich” despite having none of those things, because i was in sports and the assumption was that all my equipment and clothing was new (if it was, it was on sale). now i hear it because i go to a private university, but the truth is almost half of the tuition is paid by a scholarship, and the rest is courtesy of my parents’ savings from not buying me fancy things when i was younger, and money left to us when my aunt died. i am not the same kind of “rich” that i identified in middle school, but to some people i have more than they ever will.

according to forbes.com, several charts with different measurements all show that the poorest people in america are richer than most of the wealthiest people in other countries. to some, the type of downward comparison this encourages is helpful, because then they can remember how blessed they are. yet to many people, this is infuriating. after all, being rich compared to a mexican is only relevant for someone currently living in mexico. i’ve always believed that even if something isn’t the worst thing that could happen, if it’s the worst thing that has happened to you then it matters. this is important to keep in mind, especially when children are learning at a younger and younger age that being wealthy is something to be ashamed of. how are we meant to encourage our children to pursue lofty goals when at the same time we convince them that the economically successful are somehow stealing from them and that they don’t deserve their money?

let me know your thoughts on this topic or any similar experiences you had growing up!! i love to understand more about what i’ve experienced and how accurate it is to reality. have a great weekend and stay warm *^^*

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